Ethiopia Global Infectious Disease (GID) Training Grant

Ethiopia Global Infectious Disease (GID) Training Grant

Program Overview

Supported by the Fogarty International Center at the U.S. National Institutes of Health, the Ethiopia Global Infectious Disease (GID) training grant is a 5-year project that aims to strengthen research capacity in Ethiopia in the area of childhood infectious diseases and nutrition. This grant is jointly led by Addis Continental Institute of Public Health (ACIPH) and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the United States. The program provides research training to junior- and mid-level researchers and health college faculty in substantive areas of pediatric infectious diseases, epidemiological methods, implementation science, and in career advancement areas.

The specific aims of the proposed training program are to:

  1. Develop a critical mass of mid-level public health researchers who can address priority childhood infectious disease, nutrition, and implementation science issues in the Ethiopian context by leading research programs and building additional capacity.
  2. Build a critical mass of junior public health researchers who can design and successfully carry out rigorous research projects in pediatric infectious diseases and nutrition using training and mentoring approaches designed to advance research with potential for significant impact on the nutritional status and health of the Ethiopian population.

 

Training methods include:

  • Long-term postdoctoral fellowships
  • Short-term doctoral fellowships
  • Short courses
  • Monthly seminar series
  • Annual symposia

Program Team

Principal Investigators:

  • Yemane Berhane, Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health and Director, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health
  • Wafaie Fawzi, Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Sciences, and Professor of Nutrition, Epidemiology, and Global Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Program Director:

-Alemayehu Worku, Professor of Biostatistics, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health

Program Administrators:

  • Hanna Gulema, Program Coordinator, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health
  • Patricie Niyitegeka, Program Director, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Tara Young, Program Coordinator, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Training Activities

Current Trainees

Postdoctoral trainees

  • Walelegn Yallew, Associate Professor, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health
  • Hanna Berhane, Assistant Professor, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health

 

Monthly Seminars

On the last Monday of each month, the Ethiopia GID Training Program holds virtual monthly seminars featuring the work of expert faculty in the area of pediatric infectious disease and nutrition. These seminars are open to the public via Zoom. Please click the link below to learn more about recent seminars.

  • “Prevalence and factors associated with relapse of SAM following recovery from CMAM, South Gondar Zone, Amhara region, Ethiopia.” Dereje Birhanu, Bahir Dar University (January 25, 2021).
    • Click here to view the seminar recording
  • “The options for Ethiopia towards a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine.” Dr Wondwossen Amogne, Director, Research and Technology Transfer, Addis Ababa University (December 28, 2020)
    • Click here to view the seminar recording
  • “The Global One Health initiative (GOHi): Strengthening Global Capacity to address Complex Priorities.” Dr. Wondwossen Gebreyes, Hazel C. Youngberg Distinguished Professor at the Ohio State University and Executive Director, Global One Health initiative (November 30, 2020).
    • Click here to view the seminar recording
  • “Delays in Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Pastoralist Setting of Ethiopia: Extents, Effect on Infectiousness and Challenges.” Dr. Fentabil Getnet Yimer, Jigjiga University (October 26, 2020)
    • Click here to view the seminar recording
  • “Infection prevention practices in the era of COVID-19.”Dr. Walelegn W. Yallew, Associate Professor, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health (September 28, 2020).
    • Click here to view the seminar recording
  • “Motherhood in rapidly urbanizing settings: implications on child care and nutrition.” Dr. Hanna Berhane, Assistant Professor, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health (August 31, 2020).

Short Courses

The Ethiopia GID Training Program hosts two intensive short courses each year designed to build capacity in pediatric infectious disease and nutrition research skills and general professional skills. These courses will be open to masters and doctoral level students, as well as postdoctoral researchers and junior faculty from ACIPH, Haramaya University, and Addis Ababa University. The short courses will be a four-week commitment, including: one week of pre-course preparation, one-week of in-class instruction with faculty, and two weeks of post-course wrap-up and evaluation.

Previous and upcoming short courses include:

  • April 2021: Implementation Science Research of Interventions for Nutrition and Pediatric Infectious Diseases
  • December 2020: Manuscript Writing

Annual Symposia

Each year, the Ethiopia GID Training Program will host a symposium focused on pediatric infectious diseases and nutrition. The annual symposium will be open to the broader scientific and public health communities in the country and will provide a forum to share collective experiences and lessons learned, and to build a cross-discipline network of researchers, academicians, policymakers and beyond.

Listserv

To subscribe to the GID Ethiopia listserv, please enter your email address here. We will send email communications about the monthly seminars, short courses, annual symposia and more. You may unsubscribe from the listserv at any time.

Contact Information

For any questions regarding the Ethiopia GID Training Program, please contact:

 

 

Hanna Y. Berhane, MPH, PhD

Assistant Professor, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health

Motherhood in rapidly urbanizing settings: implications on child care and nutrition

Mothers play a crucial role in the battle against malnutrition by guaranteeing children are sufficiently cared for, and nourished. However, in rapidly urbanizing settings, mothers are continually forced to adjust to the social, economic, and food environment changes compromising her ability to provide the needed care and support for her child. Thus, this study seeks to understand the lived experience and challenges of urban mothers, and how it reflects on

 

WalelegnW. Yallew, MPH, PhD

Associate Professor, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health

Infection prevention practices in the era of COVID-19

Infection is one of the preventable causes of death in healthcare settings. Infection can spread patient-to-patient, patient-to-staff, staff-to-patient, or among staff. The health system in low-and middle-income countries is weak to properly implement prevention, control, and surveillance of infection in health care settings. The vulnerability of the health care professionals and patients/clients visiting the health care facilities substantially increase during highly contagious epidemics such as Covid-19. This presentation highlights the challenges of implementing Infection prevention practices in health care settings and the potential impact on the health care system.

 

 

Fentabil Getnet Yimer, PhD

JigjigaUniversity

Delays in Diagnosis of Pulmonary Delays in Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Pastoralist Setting of Ethiopia: Extents, Effect on Infectiousness and Challenges

This presentation draws attention to the major findings of a mixed method study conducted in underserved pastoralist setting in Ethiopia. The study investigated the extent of delays in diagnosis of pulmonary TB, the determinants of delays, the effect of delays on infectiousness (cavitation and smear positivity), and the challenges that hinder the delivery and utilization of TB services in pastoralist communities.

 

Dr. WondwossenAmogne

Director, Research and Technology Transfer

College of Health Sciences

Addis Ababa University

 

The options for Ethiopia towards a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine

Identifying COVID-19 vaccines that best suit Ethiopian setting is vital. Prioritizing whom to vaccinate in Ethiopia will help the country to prepare for the vaccine. Understanding the epidemiological significance of having a vaccine in Ethiopia is important.

 

Wondwossen Gebreyes, DVM, PhD

Hazel C. Youngberg Distinguished Professor

Executive Director, Global One Health Initiative

The Global One Health initiative (GOHi): Strengthening Global Capacity to address Complex Priorities

GOHiis a grass-root initiative that has brought together U.S. and developing region strategic university and research institute partners in eastern Africa, Latin America and Asia since 2009. Within a joint venture, the collaborative initiative identified key priorities based on local and regional needs. To that goal, GOHihas been working on various foodborne, waterborne and vector-borne diseases as well as associated issues such as antimicrobial resistance and cancer. GOHi’sprojects have been building capacity of research, training and outreach.  With sponsorship provided from multiple sources including the NIH Fogarty International Center, CDC Global Health Security, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and other foundations, we have been strengthening integrated one health capacity in emerging infectious zoonotic diseases as well as non-communicable diseases. Our vision is building capable professionals and institutional systems for a healthy and enduring global community.

 

Dereje Birhanu, PhD

Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia

Children with secure acute malnutrition (SAM) without complications & those with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) may be treated in the community setting without requiring admission to a health facility (Community-Based Management of Acute Malnutrition). Prevalence of relapse of SAM or MAM following recovery are high. Understanding the magnitude and factors associated with relapse in a local context is important  to design solutions and appreciate the consequences

 

Professor Lulu Muhe
Honorary Professor, Addis
Ababa University
WHO Consultant

Major causes of death and complications among preterm infants in selected hospitals in Ethiopia The presentation will be based on a prospective observational study in 5 tertiary hospitals in Ethiopia. The study identifies deficiencies in the existing public health measures taking place in the country. It makes recommendations to address the high neonatal mortality in the country to meet SDG3.

Dr. Teshome Gebre
Consultant , Health Science Specialist